Kathy Fleming talks early 20th century fashionistas and the importance of accessories

Kathy Fleming
Kathy Fleming, Gloucester County Historical Society Museum coordinator, reveals how early 20th century women personalized their wardrobes.

Personality is key to individuality, especially when it comes to dressing.

What you wear can really define who you are as a person, but this is not a new idea. Kathy Fleming, Gloucester County Historical Society Museum coordinator, talks about individual style for the ladies of the early 1900s.

For them, the key to standing apart was through the adornment of accessories that followed the evolving trends at the time. The major styles in America between 1900 and 1940 shifted from a focus on constrictive corsets and modest, flowing lengths to liberating and shorter flapper dresses — all of which attracted new trends in hats, shoes, bags, jewelry and more.

Younger girls disconnected themselves from the styles of their mothers and grandmothers and — just as today — strived to stand apart from their own peers through the personalization of their clothing.

Take a tip from the elder ladies at the beginning of the century and adopt accessories into your closets! An impeccable and independent style is easy if you know how to address it.

For fans of early 20th century fashion and of hit PBS show, “Downton Abbey,” visit my post on Woodbury, NJ — News to learn more about Fleming’s work at the museum.

The following is a clip from our conversation about these women and how their approach to stand out from one another is still effective today.

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